CO2 Hoopla

CO2 Hoopla

If you’re aware of global warming, or should I say ‘climate change’ than you’ve been bombarded by the hoopla of CO2 . . . you know, the consequences of its overabundance. So I found all the hoopla to be ironic when reading a June 21, 2017 article about a “long-term” (”decade-long”) experiment in a U.K. woodland park where “fossil fuel burning” will “measure the forest’s capacity to capture carbon released”.  The CO2 to be pumped in is “nearly 40 percent more” than normal (“levels of CO2 that experts predict will be prevalent in 2050”).

Of course, at the time of reading, I had several questions pop into mind:

  1. Why is the experiment being done in a park, rather than at a super-isolated area, away from people and towns?
  2. Are other parks in U.K. or elsewhere being used to conduct same or similar experiments?
  3. Why so many years needed for this research to obtain results?
  4. How in the world with all the CO2 regulations/limitations – past, present and future – can scientists actually predict there will be a possible 40% CO2 increase by 2050?
  5. Who thought of and agreed to this “decade-long” experiment?
  6. What is the actual purpose for this, in my opinion, nefarious money-grabbing research?
  7. Who’s actually funding this experiment? Taxpayers?
  8. Why pump excessive amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere when the need for reductions are constantly being emphasized by climate change activists?
  9. What are possible health threats to the general public at park or near the area?
  10. Are local residents and park visitors aware of this experiment? If so, what do they think about it?

Anyhoo, noticed on 10/8/17 that the article had been updated (Note: Same date and time as original publication.):

“(This version of the June 21 story deletes final paragraph which incorrectly states remaining area is open to public)”

Also on 10/8/17, located article copy containing final paragraph:

“The remainder of the Norbury Park woodland is open to the public and will not be affected by the experiment.”

Apparently, park personnel and public were not aware of the update. See Family Fun Day at Norbury Park (July 8, 2017)

Interestingly, “Norbury Park is a working landscape, with farms and a commercial sawmill” and “large part has been designated a Site of Special Scientific Interest”. Read about Norbury Park.  On same Web page, in lower right menu, there’s a link to the Norbury Park Visitor Guide and Self-guided Trail leaflet . . . a PDF file you can read, print and download. Both URLs (page and PDF) available on 10/8/17 and 10/13/17.

So, no more hoopla from me . . . for now.

Oh, I take that back. Here’s my CO2 Hoopla Sporkplode:

Oh, my! Now that’s a wacky hoopla gal. LOL!

Take care,

Patricia Spork

Dead Donkey in a Vein

Dead Donkey in a Vein

Having owned a couple of donkeys throughout the years, I know a little bit about their temperament and how loyal and protective they can be when befriended by human or animal. I believe it was in June that a video surfaced showing a donkey pushed to its death at a zoo in China. I did not watch the video, for it showed the donkey being ravaged by tigers. Live food for the predators.

The donkey video caused public uproar, so much so that a donkey statue was erected in its memory at the zoo. How fitting, huh? A tactless appeasement for the public’s benefit.

On July 4, 2017, I read an article about the donkey statue. Quoted in the article:

“The sign reads: ‘I was born in the country on the farm. I should have grown up to have children and enjoy life on earth. This monument is calling for justice. I died in vein and should be remembered.’”

Notice the word ‘vein’ should be ‘vain’. The article’s headline used ‘vain’, so I wondered if the correct word got lost in translation or whether the writer made an error in word usage.

The donkey statue story caused blood-boiling veins and whirling thoughts (like a weather vane in high wind), so vain self had to sporkplode:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDV_TRp1RDo

NOTE: You’ll have to sign in and confirm your age to watch video, since I age-restricted it because concerned young child might try to search for (and find) the donkey video mentioned. I don’t think any young child should see donkey as tiger dinner. Yah, I’m weird. Personally, I think too much “live” death is shown on the Internet. Snuff films for the masses.

Snuffing out in my own way now.

Patricia Spork heads to the fridge….